What Art Would Linda Nochlin Like?

Posted: April 18, 2017 in Uncategorized

I hope you can see that this art, though well wrought and highly interesting, hardly has the sublime and heroic (male) ambitions of the work we’ve seen from the like of Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Barnett Newman, or other New York School painters. Far more than the sublime or even the beautiful, it’s interested in the human. Paintings of humans, for humans, by a human. Geniuses need not apply.

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Alice Neel
(1900 – 1984)


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dorothypearlsteinEMAIL

1978 NEEAL0004-200

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Comments
  1. Galen Bergsten says:

    I certainly see the merits in this art. Where some might stop at “It’s not good, it looks sloppy or untrained,” I would go insofar as to say that’s the point, or at least the best part. At the start of the semester I picked up a photography class for fun, with no experience using a professional camera. I enjoyed it so much that I’ve picked it up as a minor, but I’m no professional. I’ve had to learn that the quality of an image isn’t all there is to photography, and that’s led to some of my best work capitalizing on my (lack of) skills. I don’t know if Nochlin was inclined to “higher level” art (though I shudder to use that term), but if she was, she certainly had the same realization. And that’s what makes her art (or, just her) so profound.

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